Murphy's Law


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Murphy's Law

An adage stating, "Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong." Murphy's Law is used in business because of the inherent unpredictability of risk.
References in periodicals archive ?
A very courageous decision was taken, a couple of series back, to take Murphy's Law to the dark side and it was the right decision.
Even NASA's Mercury astronauts recognized Murphy's Law in 1962 in a Navy training film.
Murphy's Law is close to bad luck, but the difference is that it's common stuff going wrong.
Murphy's Law runs for six episodes and each one sees Nesbitt adopting a different undercover persona.
TOP COP James Nesbitt as he appears in Murphy's Law
Thus, hedging with futures is immune to Murphy's law -- no matter what happens, the company effectively freezes its health-care costs in advance.
To convince the reader (and perhaps himself) that Murphy's Law of bad economics making good politics can be overcome, Blinder points to the Tax Reform Act of 1986.
Currently in production are new series of BBC hits Charlie and Lola and detective drama Murphy's Law, the Catherine Tate Show and BBC one's prestige new drama series Robin Hood.
If it does, you will be tempted to think Murphy's Law proven.
VIEWERS will get to see a different side to James Nesbitt's undercover cop in Murphy's Law which returns this evening.
For five games and three innings, Alex Frazier and the JetHawks were living Murphy's Law.
And you can look upon this as a taster for the new series of Murphy's Law which starts on BBC1 on Monday.