Justice

(redirected from Mrs Justice)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Justice

The virtue by which each person is given what he or she deserves. For example, justice requires that an employee be paid for work done, or that a scofflaw be punished for his or her crimes. Justice is perhaps the most important concept in law. Many people seeking social change do so because they believe current systems are unjust in some way. For example, a socialist may believe it is unjust that a worker does not have the legal right to profit from the value he/she adds, while a capitalist may argue that it is unjust to deprive the owners of capital or other assets of their property.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 2017, Mrs Justice Sophia Adinyira has been a member of the General Legal Council and a chairperson on various committees.
But Mrs Justice Jefford dispelled that as she said Huchet, along with Jones, took a full part in the violence even if it was led by Phillips.
But Mrs Justice Lieven said the girl's grandmother could not meet her needs.
Mrs Justice Theis was told that Ms Root had removed offending material from the internet.
"The appeal will be dismissed," concluded Mrs Justice Carr, who was sitting with Mr Justice Julian Knowles.
Although some of the boys involved were aged 16, others were only 13, said Mrs Justice Andrews, who was sitting with two other judges.
Rejecting his appeal, Mrs Justice Cutts said: "None of the grounds put forward afford him any prospect of persuading this court that the jury's verdicts were wrong.
Sentencing Stirling, Mrs Justice Susan Carr said: "Samantha was alone in her home where she should have been safe and sound, and trusted you in her house.
This was planned a woman gated house Mrs Justice Carr His lawyers argued that the 12-year jail term for the robbery was far too tough, and so was the six months consecutive for the failures to surrender.
Mrs Justice Farbey said that under law the First Minister was the only person empowered to establish an investigation.
"Collins was entitled to and should have received some small credit for his guilty pleas," concluded Mrs Justice Cutts.
At London's Appeal Court, his lawyers asked Mrs Justice Andrews to cut his sentence, claiming he was treated too harshly.