Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kant (2006b: 448) argues that we can find our way out from how things stand when we use our rational capacities, and this we do when we act under the idea of freedom, (11) which means that we can adhere either to the moral law or to the principle of self-love, and since we cannot avoid choosing between either one or the other of them, according to him, we cannot avoid deciding whether we will have one or the other of them as the governing principle for our actions.
His remark on the morality of slavery during the debate with Douglas provides a glimpse at a deeper law we will now discuss, an unchangeable law which, like natural law, governs the universe: moral law.
(1) What is essential to any moral worth of actions is that the moral law determine the will immediately.
Applied to moral laws, explanandum considerations may suggest several seemingly plausible ways that laws could be explained.
If Positive Laws contravene the Moral Law - like in the case of "same-sex" unions -- citizens not only can refuse to obey them; they have the obligation to defy these immoral Laws.
The fact that this reviewer had read a significant proportion of the material presented in God and Moral Law in previously published articles does not give the book a fragmented or dated feel.
For Aquinas, what is at stake in any morally complex situation is not only made evident by the clarifying truth of the moral law. Instead, practical reason in all its variety--as wisdom, prudence, science, common sense, knowledge gained from the senses, etc.--must also be brought to bear to determine what is morally obliged.
The conduct of the rioters is evidence that for them this moral law has broken down.
Students, teachers, parents, officials who are "openly gay" are no longer faithful to the demand to "unite to the sacrifice of the Lord's Cross the difficulties they may encounter from their condition." They have set their personal conscience and reason in opposition to God's moral law. They reject God's Church and therefore should not be counted as Catholics.
The two main camps are those, the majority, who maintain that the moral law motivates action only in a nonfeeling way, and those who, against the majority, insist that Kant is committed to the moral law providing motivation through feeling.
It states that there is a moral law and a therefore a lawgiver.
Seven friend-of-the-court briefs have been filed on the county's behalf, including those by: the Rutherford Institute, the National Legal Foundation, the Retired Judges of America, Independence Law Center, the Foundation for Moral Law, the Justice and Freedom Fund of California, and a joint brief by the N.C.