Moore's Law

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Moore's Law

In technology, a theory stating that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit doubles every 18 months. Moore's Law was first articulated by George Moore, who co-founded Intel, in 1965. His original statement was that the doubling occurred every 12 months, but the pace has not been that fast for some time. Nevertheless, Moore's Law is expected to apply until at least 2017, when physical limitation is predicted to force the rate of development to slow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moores law turned out to be incredibly accurate, growing beyond its predictive character to become an industry driver that holds true today, 50 years later.
As the industry upholds this prediction and brings forth new innovations in chip technology, the future of Moores law will impact such things as healthcare, a sustainable climate, and safer transport all for the better.
Although Moores law was created more than 50 years ago, it remains extremely valid and serves as a guide to what we innovate at imec, continued Van den hove.