Moore's Law


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Moore's Law

In technology, a theory stating that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit doubles every 18 months. Moore's Law was first articulated by George Moore, who co-founded Intel, in 1965. His original statement was that the doubling occurred every 12 months, but the pace has not been that fast for some time. Nevertheless, Moore's Law is expected to apply until at least 2017, when physical limitation is predicted to force the rate of development to slow.
References in periodicals archive ?
DARPA's new Electronics Resurgence Initiative will look at what comes after Moore's Law runs its course.
Using Moore's Law as a starting point, let's assume that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit doubles every 18 months as a lower bound and every three years as an upper bound.
"To me, the end of Moore's Law is certain," Armstrong said.
Today, it's no secret Moore's Law is becoming more and more difficult to accomplish.
Until now, Moore's Law had ensured that the performance of computer chips doubled every 18 months.
The bulk of the evidence suggests information technology has delivered both technically and economically: it has achieved the promise of Moore's Law in both its narrowest sense of transistor scaling and its broadest effect of widespread economic uplift.
Here, Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director of industrial automation components supplier European Automation, analyses the rate of technological progress and discusses the validity of Moore's Law.
Expected growth is supported by the wider adoption of Cu pillar technology, as well as Moore's law pushing beyond the 28nm node and "More than Moore" evolution in DDR and 3D ICs, according to the research firm.
BOHR: Moore's Law is a driving force of technological, economic and social change and is a foundational force in modern life.
Our overall strategy is to build on core assets like the PC and move into new, adjacent markets such as the Internet of Things (IoT), all the while continuing our leadership through the power of Moore's Law.
What's next Historically, improvements in energy efficiency have largely come as a byproduct of Moore's Law -- the doubling of the number of transistors on a chip about every two years through ever smaller circuitry.