Monism

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Related to Monists: Dualists

Monism

The concept that domestic and international law form a complete whole. That is, monist courts are required to enforce international law when it contradicts municipal law. For example, when a treaty becomes the law of the land upon passage, the legislature does not have to change contradictory laws because the treaty does so already. The United States has a monist state because its Constitution states that treaties are the law of the land upon ratification. See also: Dualism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(78) Possibly in emulation of his teacher, al-Biqa'i gave his Sufi Monist opponents three options: debate, mubahala, or duel.
(186) This approach overcomes the issues raised with the above alternate models, as the systems maintain separate rules of attribution (which posed problems for the monist argument) and yet can adopt findings of the legal elements of the primary obligation (which posed issues for the dualist argument).
Some monists require that a state's legal rules be derived
Out of this organizational matrix emerged the German Freethought League (18 81) and the German Monist League (1906).
According to the monist, there is only one reality that includes in its being all finite reality as well as divine reality with no distinction between the two.
The reasons why it does matter, however, and why the monist scientist should not be careless in the usage of ontological terms, lie in the reinforcement history and context of the listener.
A number of drawbacks to the "liberal monist" position suggest themselves.
Before doing so, it will be helpful to examine and take sides in yet another international law debate--that of the monists versus the dualists.
But they were not in the tradition of the material monists, like Thales, who were trying to find one basic physical element; rather (and closer to Orphic tradition) their number theory was cosmogonic.(12) Other such contrasts could be enunciated, but the main point is clear: the Pythagoreans philosophized to provide a basis for their religion, and the original figure of Pythagoras as prophet was central to that enterprise.(13) Post-Platonic Pythagoreanism, especially in its Iamblichean variety, as we shall see, only intensified Pythagoras's centrality.
4, 41 (1995) ("[T]he dualists soundly thrashed the monists."); see also James A.R.
The monists themselves have long since ceased to inhabit a socialist cultural world.
Nothing is more insulting to cultural monists than a successful two-track career.