money market

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Related to Money-market funds: Money market mutual funds

Money market

Money markets are for borrowing and lending money for three years or less. The securities in a money market can be U.S.government bonds, Treasury bills and commercial paper from banks and companies.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Money Market

The trading of highly liquid, short-term assets and securities. Examples include U.S. Treasury bills and commercial paper. The money market is often, though not always, included in counts of the money supply. One may trade on the money market either on an exchange or over-the-counter.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

money market

The market for trading short-term, low-risk securities such as commercial paper, U.S. Treasury bills, bankers' acceptances, and negotiable certificates of deposit. The market is made up of dealers in these securities who are linked by electronic communications.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Money market.

The money market isn't a place. It's the continual buying and selling of short-term liquid investments.

Those investments include Treasury bills, certificates of deposit (CDs), commercial paper, and other debt issued by corporations and governments. These investments are also known as money market instruments.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

money market

a MARKET engaged in the short-term lending and borrowing of MONEY, linking together the financial institutions (COMMERCIAL BANKS, DISCOUNT HOUSES etc.), companies and the government. To take one example: a company with surplus short-term funds might deposit these funds with its commercial bank, which in turn places them on ‘call’ (deposit) with a discount house. The discount house in turn uses the money to purchase TREASURY BILLS issued by the government. See DISCOUNT MARKET.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

money market

a MARKET engaged in the short-term lending and borrowing of MONEY, linking together the financial institutions (COMMERCIAL BANKS, DISCOUNT HOUSES, etc.), companies and the government. To take one example: a company with surplus short-term funds might deposit these funds with its commercial bank, which in turn places them on ‘call’ (deposit) with a discount house. The discount house in turn uses the money to purchase TREASURY BILLS issued by the government. See DISCOUNT MARKET, BILLS OF EXCHANGE, CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2010, the President's Working Group on Financial Markets released its long-awaited report on the options available for reforming money-market funds. It found that while the Securities and Exchange Commission's amended rules increased the resilience of the funds and reduced their risks, more still needed to be done to lower the risk of a run on money funds in the future.
Hot on the heels of those recommendations, across the Atlantic the U.K.'s Financial Stability Board announced in September that its Shadow Banking Task Force has set up five different work streams to determine whether further regulatory action is needed in specific areas, including money-market funds. Again, the prospect of abolishing CNAV funds in favor of VNAV is likely to be under consideration.
Many advisers believe that you cannot have a money-market fund in the plan that directly competes with the stable value fund.
For many investors, the most attractive feature of an asset management account is the "sweep." This is where all accumulated interest, dividends or proceeds from the sales of securities are swept into the selected money-market fund. So, the money in the account is reinvested continuously.
* Money-Market Funds: From double-digit returns a couple of years ago, money-market funds yields have tumbled to an average of 5.4%.
Because most money-market funds are part of a larger mutual fund family, an owner could transfer into a stock or bond mutual fund at a later date, when the market changes.