Money center banks


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Money center banks

Banks that raise most of their funds from the domestic and international money markets , relying less on depositors for funds.

Money Center Bank

A large commercial bank in a major city. Smaller banks use the interest rates and business practices of money center banks to influence their own. For that reason, money center banks are considered leaders (at least regionally). They are also called money market center banks.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is realized by increasing the exposure to money center banks, and increasing the exposure of transactions with foreign banks.
Among money center banks, Citigroup (C) seems to be a favorite.
The data permit a crude attempt to measure lags in monetary policy, at least from the time money center banks actually react to a change in Federal Reserve policy until it shows up on Main Street as changes in the ease of getting, a loan (money center banks may also be responding to changes in economic conditions independent of any change in Federal Reserve policy).
For all record purposes, the listing of Sri Lankan corporates in the TSE would enable the Sri Lankan corporates to tap and to raise funds from external (international) sources, money center banks and markets.
Citi is rebuilding its investment banking operations, says McGee, anticipating simultaneous rises in the economy and lending as money center banks will be needed to assist the financial rebuilding of the domestic and global economies.
With interest rates plummeting to all-time lows, and checking account operational costs continuing to rise as new features are added, large money center banks are struggling to find acceptable ways to change the monthly fees on consumer checking accounts.
(ADI802) Money Center Banks Hold Strong Balance Sheets & Expect Cyclical Upturn - Richard X.
From the New York Web site: While many of the money center banks are sitting on the sidelines in providing mortgage financing, Chinese, German and European financial institutions and insurance companies are dipping their feet into the water to provide much needed financing for commercial real estate.
With the subprime mortgage crisis, the fall of housing prices and the recession, many large money center banks have suffered a decline in the value of their loan portfolios.
The large money center banks are traditional sources, but they aren't lending much either.
This is assumed to eliminate the large money center banks on one end and the small community banks on the other.
Also at that time was born the informal policy of "too big to fail," under which the Fed and other regulators took extraordinary means to keep several money center banks afloat during the 1989-91 recession.