Money-Purchase Pension Plan

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Money-Purchase Pension Plan

A defined contribution pension in which an employer must contribute an amount equal to a certain percentage of the employee's compensation, usually 25%. While the amount of employer contribution is fixed, the amount of benefit is not. There are also penalties associated with receiving payments from the pension before retirement. These contributions are tax-deductible for the employer and guarantee the employee a certain amount of principal in the pension plan.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those in defined contribution or money purchase pensions have not escaped the effects of QE either, the NAPF said.
However, the trade-off is that benefit accrual must cease afterApril 5, 2012; for money purchase pensions this means contributions must cease, and for final salary pensions the benefit value cannot increase by more than a 'relevant percentage'.
Other key results from the Amicus Pensions survey: - 83% felt the main reason employers were changing from final salary pensions to money purchase pensions was to reduce their contributions compared to only 2% who felt it was because employers thought money purchase pensions were better for employees.
Among the possibilities being considered are a ``freezing'' of the final salary scheme - already closed to new members - and a ``hybrid option'' involving part final salary and part money purchase pensions.
Many money purchase pensions - where cash is paid into a fund and invested to build up a lump sum to buy a pension at retirement - were not contributing enough to give investors a decent income.
Passport is a client/server based recordkeeping system that uses a transaction-based database design for on-demand processing of defined contribution plans such as 401(k), profit sharing, employee stock ownership, savings, and money purchase pensions.
It claimed that Government's plan to compel employers to contribute to the new Personal Accounts, the money purchase pensions envisaged in the new Pensions Bill, might as well be an increase in National Insurance contributions, one more tax.
Newcomers to companies such as Tesco, Deeside-based The Big Food Group who own the Iceland frozen food chain and Littlewoods will no longer benefit from a final salary pension after these were ditched in favour of money purchase pensions.
Jason Hollands, deputy managing director of Bestinvest, said, "The future is very uncertain for the average person in the UK, especially as final salary pension schemes are increasingly being ditched in favour of money purchase pensions.
3 billion, boosted by last year's relaxation of the tax rules for personal pensions and companies buying money purchase pensions for their employees after closing final salary schemes.
The move has been made from Defined Benefit (DB), final salary pensions - which can be around 15 per cent of a person's salary, to Defined Contribution (DC), money purchase pensions - where contributions can range between six and 10 per cent.
The move from final salary schemes to money purchase pensions is just one aspect.