Money Income

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Money Income

The dollar amount of income, without regard for purchasing power, inflation, or other factors that may affect an income's value. See also: Real Income, New York Dollar.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is too easy for an inflationary spike to wipe out any gains in money incomes of the poor.
Economists begin by summing up everyone's money incomes to derive nominal Gross Domestic Product -- or, for the sake of simplicity, the country's total money income (N).
One may retort that an increase in real national income, R, is always good news, even if money incomes are falling.
Workers bargain for money wages, and a reduction in their money incomes might leave total demand too low to employ all those willing to work.
in the spring of 1955 (the most recent such survey available at the time of Orshansky's study), indicated that American nonfarm families of two or more were devoting an average of roughly one-third of their after-tax money incomes to food.
(CPI-scaled adjustments were subsequently utilized to calculate poverty thresholds, and thus official poverty rates, back as far as 1959--i.e., the year against which the household money incomes in the 1960 census were reported.)
Sir Roy explains: "Gross domestic income is the sum of all money incomes, before depreciation, arising from the current economic activity of all those, whether nationals or foreigners, concerned with the domestic economy of the UK.
Radner, "Money Incomes of Aged and Nonaged Family Units, 1967-1984," Social Security Bulletin, August 1987, pp.
Persons living in households reporting money incomes below these thresholds are classified as poor.
Even wives who are not year-round full-time employees generally make meaningful contributions to their families' annual money incomes.
The aggregate income deficit is the amount of money needed to raise the money incomes of all poor families and unrelated persons(5) just above the poverty level applicable to their family size in any given year.
Most of these are based on the personal income data compiled by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) and the money income data collected by the Bureau of the Census (BC).