Money Gift

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Money Gift

Cash or a cash equivalent that an individual transfers to another individual while neither receiving nor expecting anything in return. As with all gifts, a money gift is taxable in the United States, but only if its value exceeds $13,000 (in 2009) and is not specifically excluded. For example, gifts between spouses are not taxable under any circumstances. See also: Estate, Gift Tax.
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It was a joyous occasion for children as they received the customary Eid money gifts from senior members of the family.
5) Eideyya: Are money gifts for children during Eid.
Of course, it's not all about the fun times - you need to remember the more serious aspect of money gifts, too.
Supreme Court decisions have sided with the notion that not restricting money gifts to members of Congress supports the First Amendment.
It might be, unfortunately, that researchers and the executives reading the study care more about the former than the latter statistics, since organizations tend to desire money gifts far more than donated skills.
Kids' stuff DON'T forget Father's Day on Sunday, with our round-up of pocket money gifts.
The couple headed to Hereford, Texas - the beef farming capital of the world - for their honeymoon and are planning to spend their wedding money gifts on a new herd of British Blue cattle.
The ethics committee report said: "The committee is also of the opinion that the respective money gifts can probably only be explained if they are associated with the FIFA presidential elections of June 1, 2011.
The report adds: "The committee is also of the opinion that the respective money gifts can probably only be explained if they are associated with the FIFA presidential elections of 1 June 2011.
Of declared enmity with fallen friends and high revenge, of aunts with wet kisses and neighbour's broken windows, of levels of wanton cruelty that only boys can reach in air-gunning little birds and nicknames and appetites that just wouldn't be satiated, of holidays to grandparents and money gifts from relatives, of measles and mumps and chicken pox and soup and spoiling, of a time that we thought would never end.
Afterwards, people usually visit various family and friends, give money gifts, especially to children, and celebrate the feast by eating the kahk, whose presence this Eid on Egyptian tables is doubtful.