Mommy Track


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Mommy Track

A path in one's career in which one has little chance of advancement. The term implies that because one prioritizes family obligations over work obligations, one is unlikely to receive promotions or major responsibilities. See also: Career-limiting move.
References in periodicals archive ?
We illustrate gendering processes in three organizational settings: show pieces (the token position of the few women in top functions), the mommy track (the side track into which many women with young children are shunted) and the importance of being asked (the gendered practices of career making).
An often described phenomenon, clearly recognizable in the cases, is the so-called mommy track. The mommy track is a specific manifestation of a more general social practice concerning the offside-position, somehow atypical, employees.
When Schwartz's ideas were first published in 1989, they quickly sank under the weight of the term "mommy track," a phrase Schwartz never actually used.
And if other women were more willing to take up the battle that Schwartz has begun--a more prosaic battle than the one that emerges from Backlash, but one far more likely to improve the quality of women's lives--then maybe getting off the mommy track won't be quite as difficult for this year's Smith graduates as it has been in the past.
This is in striking contrast to their wives, who are seen as having to make a choice between work and family: either the fast track or the mommy track. Let's reconsider the need for this all-or-nothing choice.
They've tried part-time, mommy track, partner track, small firm, big firm, solo.
Would any government program have enabled her to achieve parity with colleagues, male and female, who are not on the "mommy track"?
It doesn't matter that Deborah Eappen was on the medical mommy track, working three days a week as an ophthalmologist and coming home to eat lunch and breastfeed.
When Felice Schwartz concocted the Mommy Track, the real story was how few professional women wanted to get on it.
One might also note that some of the biggest mostly female job categories are famously inflexible (nursing) and require constantly updated skills (anything involving computers), and that the 29-cent wage gap concerns full-time workers, not part-timers on the "mommy track." Besides, childless women also earn less than men as time goes on.
To be sure, nitpickers and moralists across the political spectrum will find fault with his proposals, which cover, among other things: family planning; birth control; abortion; changes in tax laws to benefit "stay-at-home" parents; the creation of "mommy tracks" and "daddy tracks" in the workplace; paid parental leave; flexible work hours; and a professional advertisement campaign attacking illegitimacy and divorce, aimed at making the desirability of two-parent families a public health issue.
A majority of MBA women who reported quitting jobs once they had young children, 70 percent, said they did so because their employers weren't supportive or had "mommy tracked" them against their wishes.