mini-tender offer

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Mini-Tender Offer

A tender offer for less than 5% of shares outstanding. A tender offer is an offer to buy a significant amount of stock in a publicly-traded company directly from shareholders, an act that bypasses the board of directors. A tender offer may be part of a hostile takeover and therefore any offer exceeding 5% of the company's shares must be registered with the SEC and submitted to oversight. A mini-tender offer avoids this requirement, which can be detrimental to shareholders, as the SEC does not have the ability to protect their rights.

mini-tender offer

An offer to purchase less than 5% of a company's stock. Investors are at greater danger in a mini-tender offer because it is not subject to many of the SEC disclosure and procedural protections that apply to traditional tender offers. For example, tendering shares in a mini-tender offer generally means an investor cannot change his or her mind even though the tender has not closed.
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The SEC has cautioned investors that some bidders making mini-tender offers at below-market prices are 'hoping that they will catch investors off guard if the investors do not compare the offer price to the current market price.' More on the SEC's guidance to investors on mini-tender offers is available at www.sec.gov/investor/pubs/minitend.htm.
TRC Capital has made many similar mini-tender offers for shares of other companies.
Mini-tender offers seek to acquire less than five percent of a company's outstanding shares, thereby avoiding many disclosure and procedural requirements under U.S.
The SEC has cautioned investors that some bidders making mini-tender offers at below-market prices are "hoping that they will catch investors off guard if the investors do not compare the offer price to the current market price." More on the SEC's guidance to investors on mini-tender offers is available at www.sec.gov/investor/pubs/minitend.htm.
Mini-tender offers seek to acquire less than five percent of a company's outstanding shares, thereby avoiding many disclosure and procedural requirements under US federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).
Mini-tender offers seek less than 5% of a company's outstanding shares.
MacKenzie has had limited success in acquiring shares from HTI's stockholders in its several previous mini-tender offers. HTI's board of directors strongly recommends that HTI's stockholders reject the latest MacKenzie offer, because, among other reasons:
Mini-tender offers are offers to buy less than 5% of outstanding shares of a company.
Mini-tender offers are designed to seek to acquire less than 5% of a company's outstanding shares, thereby avoiding many disclosure and procedural requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission that apply to offers for more than 5% of a company's outstanding shares.
Mini-tender offers are not subject to many of the investor protections afforded to larger tender offers, including the filing of disclosure and other tender offer documents with the U.S.
Mini-tender offers seek to acquire less than 5% of a company's outstanding shares.
Mini-tender offers, such as TRC's offer, are not subject to many of the disclosure and procedural requirements afforded to larger tender offers, including the filing of disclosure and other tender offer documents with the US Securities and Exchange Commission and other procedures mandated by US securities laws.