Mill, John Stuart

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Mill, John Stuart

(1806–73) an English economist who helped develop CLASSICAL ECONOMIC theory in his book Principles of Political Economy with some of their Applications to Social Philosophy (1848). Mill was a social reformer, and although he preferred to see the production and exchange of goods taking place in free markets, he argued that government intervention could improve the material wellbeing of the people through REDISTRIBUTION OF INCOME. Mill was the first to argue that educational barriers to labour mobility could create non-competing groups of labour with permanent differences in wage rates between groups. He was also the first to analyse costs where two or more joint products are produced in fixed proportions.
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Craig Millian joins as Senior Vice President and Head of EMD Serono's US Fertility, Metabolic Endocrinology and HIV franchise after takingover this role on an ad-interim basis earlier this year.
Millian proposed that he and Papadopoulos form an energy-related business that would be financed by Russian billionaires "who are not under sanctions" and would "open all doors for us" at "any level all the way to the top".
In his new role, Millian will lead the strategic direction of the Company's US Neurology and Immunology franchise.
Scanlon subsequently criticized the Millian principle on other grounds than I explore here and embraced a modified, but broader, theory of freedom of speech that, inter alia, offers primary recognition to speaker and audience interests.
Building on Mill's essay, Walzer now reengages the Millian argument and discusses three cases where an intervention serves the underlying purposes that nonintervention was designed to uphold.
While here, Mr Millian will tour the Red House Museum in Gomersal and Oakwell Hall in Birstall.
For starters, I am skeptical that the foregoing "goods" remain valuable when people use their liberty, Kantian or Millian autonomy, or preference for unconstrained decision making in ways we agree to be wrongful.
According to Devitt & Sterelny (1999), the Millian view is the view that the meaning of a name is exhausted by its role of designating its bearer.
They are no less a problem for Millian attempts to deal with empty names, of course.
1240 (2004); see also Keith Burgess-Jackson, Our Millian Constitution:
Autonomy is realized whenever persons lead lives they find meaningful--even when they do not choose their lives through Millian experimentation and the lives they prefer are not liberal in substance.
Perhaps even more importantly, Millian "social justice" cannot be realized by an individual agent but requires organized collective--political--action.