Millennial

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Related to Millennials: Generation Z, Millennial Generation

Millennial

A member of the generation that was born roughly between 1980 and 2000. Millennials grew up during economic and political flux, experiencing the end of the Cold War, the dotcom bubble, the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the late 2000s recession. Perhaps because of the sometimes volatile environment in which they were raised, millennials tend to marry and undergo other rites of passage later than earlier generations. They also tend to be technically savvy, which makes them a major demographic for technology marketers.
References in periodicals archive ?
To overcome future challenges over the next five to ten years, Millennials said the key qualities of a boss will be their integrity (43%), fairness (40%) and problem-solving skills (37%).
By as early as 2025, as much as 75 percent of the global workforce could be millennials and they will bring a whole new set of demands and expectations on the modern workplace.
"Millennial make up only 18% of small business owners, but they are changing the way many think about entrepreneurship," says David Nilssen, CEO of Guidant Financial.
The authors' conclusive results show that the assumptions that millennials own and drive vehicles less than previous generations are invalid.
"From the economic recession a decade ago to the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Millennials and Gen Zs have grown up in a unique moment in time impacting connectivity, trust, privacy, social mobility and work," says Fahoum.
Affordability is such a key factor for millennial home buyers that this generation is moving to places previous generations have not, likeBuffalo, N.Y., the top affordable market for millennials, according to this study.
But when millennials speak out about our experiences, we are often told we are complaining or whining.
* According to data in Pew's Millennial Life: How Young Adulthood Today Compares with Prior Generations, which was published earlier this month, "Millennials with a bachelor's degree or more and a full-time job had median annual earnings valued at $56,000 in 2018." That's not bad.
In the research, Millennials (18-34 year olds) were 50 percent less likely than Baby Boomers (50-65 years old) to say that they couldn't ever imagine wanting to change their banks.
The lose-lose situation that he spoke about comes from the feeling that most descriptions of millennials have long been dished out with a dash of disdain.
"For Millennials, it's all about their risk capacity, because they have so much time," says Katherine Roy, chief retirement strategist at J.P.
Millennials are not looking for a bank -- they are looking for a service and they will get it from whoever will give it to them in a friendly, timely and convenient manner.