Tooth

(redirected from Milk teeth)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Tooth

Describing paper with rough texture, which makes the paper able to receive ink more easily.
References in periodicals archive ?
Children from across the world have helped to make the sculpture by donating their milk teeth. Gina who has two daughters, Lola, aged 10, and Saskia, aged 12 says: "When she was seven-yearsold my eldest daughter came home and said: 'Tell me the truth - is the tooth fairy real?' As a parent you don't know how to answer that.
REGULAR TRIPS TO DENTIST Take your child to the dentist when their first milk teeth appear so they become familiar with it and get to know the dentist.
is week a report came out which said nearly half of eight-year-olds and a third of ve-year-olds have signs of nastiness (aka decay) in their milk teeth, meanwhile one in every three 12 and 15-year-olds said they were embarrassed to smile or laugh because of the condition of their teeth.
| Archaeologists at the site of the Roman coffin discovery in North |Warwickshire and (below) two bangles and some milk teeth found in the coffin
This is especially a problem when children are growing out of their milk teeth because any prior abscesses they have will threaten the health of their permanent teeth in future," he said.
CALLING all youngsters - the Bluecoat is asking for you to donate your milk teeth to create a new artwork.
His abrasive, direct approach caused friction; his tenure of the post at a council that never grew out of milk teeth lasted four months.
The Daresbury Science & Innovation Park-based firm harvests stem cells from baby milk teeth that can be used later to tackle possible disorders such as Parkinsons and Alzheimer's that run in donors' families by growing new nerve tissue from the cells.
Sophie Waller suffered an apparent extreme dental phobia and refused to eat, sleep or drink after her milk teeth came loose.
Sophie Waller is believed to have suffered from such an extreme fear she refused to eat, drink or speak when her milk teeth started to come loose.
A report called Children's Dental Health in the UK 1993, found that 50% of children aged five to six had erosion on their milk teeth.
And nearly a third of parents in the UK wait until their children have all their milk teeth before taking them to the dentist for the first time, according to the study of 1,000 parents with kids under 13.