mid-cap

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Mid-Cap

Describing a publicly-traded company with medium amount in market capitalization. In general, a mid-cap company has a market capitalization of between $2 billion and $10 billion, but there is no hard-and-fast rule. Some brokerages or exchanges have slightly different definitions of mid-cap. Some indexes track mid-cap companies, as do some exchange traded funds. See also: High-cap, Low-cap.

mid-cap

1. Of or relating to the common stock of a company with a middle level of market capitalization, usually within the range of $2 billion to $10 billion, although the cutoff points are fuzzy on both ends.
2. Of or relating to a mutual fund that holds mostly mid-cap stocks.
References in periodicals archive ?
A technical glitch delayed the start of trading on Friday on the UK blue chip FTSE 100 and midcap stock indexes for almost two hours in what was the longest outage at one of the world's top bourses in eight years.
To add to the confusion, each index defines a midcap stock slightly differently.
The rise came despite a heavy sell-off in the retail sector following a profits warning from midcap stock Woolies and a grim report from the British Retail Consortium (BRC).
Midcap stock Cordiant's return to the market following Monday's suspension resulted in a 1.88p fall to 2.87p.
Summary: Mumbai (Maharashtra) [India], July 22 (ANI): Equity benchmark indices extended losses during early hours on Monday tracking weak global cues with small and midcap stocks suffering losses.
In early company news, midcap stocks Victrex and Diploma reported contrasting first-half earnings, Metro Bank set out its plan to raise capital, and FirstGroup faced unrest from one of its shareholders.IG futures indicate the FTSE 100 index is to open 14.61 points higher at 7,217.90.
Domestic and foreign institutions were seen net sellers on the bourse, whose capitalisation tanked 2.51% to QR487bn mainly due to small and midcap stocks.
"Following the outperformance of small and midcap stocks, many of these stocks now command a premium valuation, compared to their larger peers," said Miller.
Smallcap and midcap stocks, which in previous sessions had bucked a weak trend, saw a huge sell- off with their indices falling over three per cent each.
"It is true that small- and midcap stocks have taken a beating recently and are available much cheaper than they were six months ago, but we do not know if their downward journey will stop here," says P V Subramanyam, a financial market expert and chartered accountant.
"Valuations are more attractive and opportunities are bigger" in midcap stocks, he said.
It just follows the top 400 Midcap stocks in the S&P 500 index.