Second

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Second

1. See: Second mortgage.

2. See: Second round.
References in periodicals archive ?
During water purification (the sample was taken from the Kharkiv river in a volume of 3 liters) using microsecond discharges in gas bubbles (see Fig.
The Bubble Sort algorithm proved to be the most inefficient, obtaining in java an average run-time / array of 1329.853091 microseconds, in C ++ an average run-time / vector of 3339.091910 microseconds, and in C# an average run-time / vector of 5591.868977 microseconds.
* chirp duration: 15 microseconds; time between chirps: 100 microseconds; sampling frequency: 10 MHz;
Light travels at 186,000 miles per second in a vacuum, so it takes a bit over eight microseconds to travel one mile in a fiber optic cable.
The latest version of TIBCO Rendezvous provides even lower and more predictable microsecond latency, improves manageability, and delivers the reliability to address IT challenges and aid business responsiveness to threats and opportunities relevant to the financial services and other real-time data-driven industries.
Making the plutonium bomb-building process especially difficult is the problem that Rhodes cites as the most difficult task in the Manhattan Project from the scientists' perspective: taking a hollow sphere of plutonium, crushing its 30 pounds into a softball sized compacted sphere, and releasing a stream of neutrons within it on a timetable of a few microseconds.
The sensor's patented microprocessor-based fast light control circuit reacts in less than eight microseconds to compensate for and accurately measure varying surfaces without regard to ambient light changes, surface texture, color, the slope of the target, steep angles, silicone content, speed and more.
Pulse widths can be programmed as short as 5 microseconds. Together with the model 2182A nanovoltmeter, the system supports pulsed IV measurements down to 50 microseconds.
By smashing gold nuclei together at near-light speeds, physicists using Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have recreated a short-lived state of hot, dense matter that existed microseconds after the Big Bang (June issue, page 26).
The smartEDDY 4.0 features a 5,000 Hz bandwidth, enabling it to make complex accept/reject decisions in ~50 microseconds. It is comprised of an instrument module, smartEDDY test software, sensor (including surface, encircling and bobbin), and an embedded computer.
Such material presumably permeated the universe during the first microseconds after the Big Bang.