Business Process

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Business Process

The series of activities undertaken to create a product or deliver a service. Companies often lay down specific rules for business process to ensure activities are completed in an organized and efficient manner. Business process may involve division of labor between multiple persons and/or technologies. For example, in a publishing company, one person may write material, a second may edit it, a third may add graphics, and a fourth may print it. Business process is also called business function.
References in periodicals archive ?
JKBS has come up at a time when the corporate landscape is undergoing continuous change as a result of globalization, impact of information technology and search for new methods of doing business.
As franchise systems have grown, franchisors have also had to seek answers and implement new, improved methods of doing business and then share that information with franchisees.
The Internet enables startups to scale up rapidly and at a low cost, unburdened by legacy systems and traditional methods of doing business, while blurring the lines between sectors.
We are happy to provide an effective alternative to the prevailing methods of doing business in the medical device industry.
eCommerce has seen a resurgence over the last two years as the global downturn has made retailers and businesses turn to more cost-effective methods of doing business.
The methods of doing business regarding international trade are different from country-to-country.
There's no secret to the success of Theodore, who sticks to old methods of doing business rather than integrating social media into his arsenal like so many others in the industry.
In some cases, such as when there is a significant decrease in the customer base, the company may have to change its methods of doing business, partner with other companies or consider mergers and acquisitions.
That said, the methods of doing business in China are now much more 'Westernised' than ever before and the rules governing the registration of intellectual property rights or patents, for example, are now very straightforward.
Nevertheless, the lesson for all employees is that each generation has preferred methods of doing business, and each method has its benefits.
Currently most companies are unable to adapt to new methods of doing business, and become crippled by high fixed costs and new competition.
Many business method patents involve known methods of doing business, where the novel contribution is to carry out the method using a computer, a network of computers, an intranet or the Internet.

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