Business Process

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Business Process

The series of activities undertaken to create a product or deliver a service. Companies often lay down specific rules for business process to ensure activities are completed in an organized and efficient manner. Business process may involve division of labor between multiple persons and/or technologies. For example, in a publishing company, one person may write material, a second may edit it, a third may add graphics, and a fourth may print it. Business process is also called business function.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Khalid Nawaz, who has command over central Asian affairs, apprised the Nippon officials about situation, rules, regulation and method of doing business in the central Asia.
first edition of its MPEP listed "a method of doing business"
The mayors, who are turning to this method of doing business, say that the same jobs can be done for less money.
And now with a fragile economy this method of doing business is clearly showing its merits.
A NEW method of doing business via email has just been made available for the very first time in Cyprus.
It has not been easy and not always the best system, but for now the only reasonable method of doing business.
Some have gone as far as to say that the disastrous Northern Rock method of doing business was just gutsy, risktaking capitalism at its best.
(5) The distinction is significant because a method of doing business embodied as a computer program necessarily uses some computing data communication system (sometimes the Internet), (6) whereas a true or pure business method patent is simply a series of steps.
This method of doing business creates the perception among aircrew that SOPs only are followed until they "get in the way." SOPs must be a living document that all members of the squadron adhere to in meeting all mission requirements.--Are all members of your command familiar with, and adhering to, applicable SOPs?
The Times said Bush and Ashcroft ''put in place a strategy for a domestic antiterror war that had all the hallmarks of the administration's normal method of doing business: a Nixonian obsession with secrecy, disrespect for civil liberties and inept management.''
The submission, which was prepared under the aegis of the Institute's E-Commerce Coordinating Committee and State and Local Tax Committee, noted that the (now-expired) moratorium had provided several benefits, such as enhancing the accessibility of the Internet, fostering electronic commerce, and advancing the principle that additional taxes should be predicated on the method of doing business. The letter is reprinted in this issue, beginning on page 488.

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