Jones Act

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Jones Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1920, that requires ships transporting cargo between U.S. ports to fly a U.S. flag, to be owned by American citizens, and to be crewed by U.S. citizens and residents. The Act was designed to protect merchant marine jobs. The Jones Act remains controversial. Critics maintain it is protectionist and results in higher prices for consumers, while supporters contend that it helps preserve American jobs and ensures trained seamen are available in times of national emergency. It is formally called the Merchant Marine Act; its colloquial name comes from Senator Wesley Jones, who sponsored it.
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The Merchant Marine Act of 1920, more commonly known as the Jones Act, requires (among other things) that all goods transported by water between U.
4) Today some critics of the Merchant Marine Act of 1920 (commonly known as the Jones Act) believe the restrictions placed in the law to support U.
In 1920 Congress enacted The Merchant Marine Act, popularly known
The program was created by the Merchant Marine Act of 1936, as amended (46 U.
The most unfair law of all is the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also known as the Jones Act, which requires that every product that enters or leaves Puerto Rico cars from Japan, engines from Germany, food from South America, medicine from Canada must be carried on a United States ship.
One complicating factor in these waterborne domestic trade flows is section 27 of the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, more commonly referred to as the Jones Act.
Merchant Marine Act of 1920 [section] 27 (Jones Act), 46 U.
In compliance with the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also known as the Jones Act, R+L Carriers serves as a trusted freight shipper between these many offshore ports.
A number of media sources and conservative Republicans began reporting that the [section] 27 of the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, (10) known as the Jones Act, hampered the cleanup efforts.
In addition to proposals for military deterrence and diplomatic engagements, policymakers may elect to consider adjustments to the federal statute (Title XII of the Merchant Marine Act of 1936, as amended) that authorizes the federal government to underwrite marine war risk insurance in circumstances such as piracy.
Its creation followed the tragic loss of life in the 1934 fire on the Morro Castle passenger ship, which moved Congress to pass the Merchant Marine Act in 1936.
The Merchant Marine Act (the Jones Act) provides seamen with the same protection from employer negligence as FELA provides railroad workers.

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