Median Voter

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Median Voter

The theoretical person who is precisely in the middle of the political spectrum of his/her community. That is, the median voter's political views are equidistant from both the most right-wing and the most left-wing person in his community. In electoral politics, it is thought that the median voter (or group of median voters) tips the election to one candidate or the other. As a result, many politicians seek to appear to be moderate prior to an election.
References in periodicals archive ?
In words, the ideology of district J'S elected official is a weighted average of the median voter in district i and the average of median voters across all of the districts.
Seventh; arranging recall elections when desired by civil society or enough petitioners; Eighth; key political decisions must approximate the wishes of the median voters and politicians with tendencies to stray too far from the middle of the public opinion, may be denied public office; Ninth; revoking the restrictions imposed on registration of new political parties and Tenth; reinstating graduation as an eligibility condition for future elections.
We can now derive the levels of the insider share [eta] at which these families are median voters. Recall that the employment states of two members of the same family are assumed to be independent.
This study investigates how US governors use grants from the federal government to pursue their own policy interests to provide benefits to their core constituents, appeal to median voters, and improve their party's electoral success.
Turning millennials into a generation of libertarian median voters means winning the battle of ideas.
district design on the representation of district-level median voters,
We need to rely on median voters on matters of collective deliberation, but we need to restrain the median voter on questions of individual rights.
Public choice theory indicates that successful politicians in such a system will reflect the ideas and values of the median voters within each of their constituencies.
(15) Frymer describes this dynamic in the context of capture, in which an ideologically peripheral group (Blacks) that overwhelmingly votes for one party (the Democratic Party) is taken for granted by that party while it appeals to median voters (moderate-to-conservative white voters).
The result is different elections with different median voters, with primaries determined by median voters considerably more partisan than in a general election.
(70) The distancing of elected representatives from the median voters was not the express aim of gerrymandering.