hit

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Hit

A unit measuring a person or IP address visiting a website. In general, the more hits a website generates, the higher revenue it earns from advertising and other sources.
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hit

1. To sell a security at a bid price quoted by a dealer. For example, a trader will hit a bid.
2. To lose money on a trade. For example, a dealer may take a hit on the holdings of Moore's Fried Foods' common stock.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using Mechanical Turk as a subject recruitment tool for experimental research.
The importance of assessing clinical phenomena in Mechanical Turk research.
(2016): "Research in the Crowdsourcing Age, a Case Study: How Scholars, Companies and Workers Are Using Mechanical Turk, a "Gig Economy" Platform, for Tasks Computers Can't Handle", PewInternet.org.
High-profile companies like Uber, TaskRabbit, or Amazon Mechanical Turk only account for less than a million workers altogether, but credible estimates (Steinmetz, 2016) indicate that 131.5 million U.S.
There were various methods for participant recruitment: 1) Snowball and referral techniques via social media (i.e., Facebook, and Twitter); 2) Amazon's Mechanical Turk; 3) Flyers handed out at bars/posted in community areas in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), New York, Stuttgart, Berlin, Barcelona, and Paris; and 4) Gay men and other MSM were also recruited in the Toronto area using Squirt.org.
ABBREVIATIONS AMT: Amazon Mechanical Turk FSU: Florida State University STORM: Stormfront.org APPENDIX A
Gosling, "Amazon's mechanical Turk: a new source of inexpensive, yet high-quality, data?" Perspectives on Psychological Science, vol.
Mechanical Turk workers toil at home, transcribing audio, typing in details of receipts, or inspecting YouTube videos for profanity.
Those with acceptable work were compensated US $0.75 through Mechanical Turk. Of these participants, 84 identified their country of origin as India (95% Asian, 1% Caucasian, 1% Pacific Islander, 3% Other), 126 identified their country of origin as the United States (82% Caucasian, 9% African American, 6% Hispanic, 2% Asian, 1% Mixed Race, 1% Other), and the countries of origin for the remaining 25 were various other countries around the world.
"This online piecework, or 'crowdwork,' represents a radical shift in how we define employment itself." She tells the story of a young Indian entrepreneur and temp worker who organized a crew to manage digital tasks for Amazon Mechanical Turk. Such subcontracting can violate agreements, and the companies often have clauses allowing them to close accounts and deny payments "for any reason." Researchers suggest that about one-third of all jobs in the United States could be so taskified before 2050.

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