currency

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Related to Means of exchange: monetary unit, National Currencies

Currency

Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Currency

Money generally accepted in circulation in a certain jurisdiction. That is, currency is any form of money that businesses in a certain jurisdiction will accept in exchange for goods and services. Usually, the domestic government sets its own currency and provides penalties to persons and businesses in its jurisdiction that do not accept it. However, some countries (especially those experiencing hyperinflation) accept other countries' currencies informally. Alternatively, a country may use the currency of another (as some countries have done with the U.S. dollar) or pool resources to make an international currency accepted in several countries (the euro being the most prominent example). See also: Foreign exchange.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

currency

or

cash

the coins and bank notes which constitute the physical component of a country's MONEY SUPPLY, i.e. coins and notes have a physical identity, whereas the other assets comprising the money supply such as bank deposits, are book-keeping entries and have no tangible life of their own. See LEGAL TENDER, FOREIGN CURRENCY.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

currency

the BANK NOTES and coins issued by the monetary authorities that form part of an economy's MONEY SUPPLY. The term currency’ is often used interchangeably with the term cash in economic analysis and monetary policy.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone needs food, and the time and productivity that go into making it available can be a means of exchange, a store of value, and a unit of account.
But, if rights become compensation for past injustices, the quantitative means of exchange that puts a number on the abstract value of oppression, we are still left with the issue of "commensurate balance." This appears to me to be the key issue in the debates about race in the past century, especially in modern debates about programs and judicial rulings (such as Affirmative Action and school vouchers) that deal with past discrimination and the legacies of oppression.
Means of exchange; dealing with silver in the Viking Age.
The main points that have been agreed so far are that the Directive should ensure that all citizens resident in an EU Member State should pay the tax due on all their savings income by means of exchange of information between national tax authorities.
One of the values of a currency is stability and the extent (to which) a currency is target of speculation as opposed to primarily a means of exchange.'
While elected governments tamely permit banks to issue our public means of exchange for massive private profit, not only do those controlling the purse strings have voters at their mercy: the rich pickings available in high finance will continue to act as a corrupting influence on those who should be putting the interests of the nation first.
These are decisions we have to make, if we don't eat we die, we therefore need some form of "liquidity" (or assets that work as a means of exchange).
Because we rely on bank loans for our means of exchange, widespread bank failure means economic chaos so taxpayers must back these risky businesses with deposit insurance.
Cash is no longer simply a means of exchange - it has become a valuable commodity.