McCarran-Ferguson Act

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McCarran-Ferguson Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1945, that exempts insurance companies from anti-trust law, except in cases of boycott, intimidation or coercion. It also states that federal law does not preempt state regulation of insurance (that is, state regulations trump federal law) unless federal legislation explicitly states otherwise. The act remains controversial.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the McCarran Ferguson Act, though, regulation of insurance is to be left to the individual states.
372 would change the version of the McCarran Ferguson Act antitrust rules that now governs health insurers.
LaFalce also said there should be "closer scrutiny" of the McCarran Ferguson Act and "probably at some point in time a federal insurance commission because insurance is such an integral part of everyday life, of national life, of international life.
I envision the possible repeal of the McCarran Ferguson Act of 1945 that left the regulation of the business of insurance to the states.
Along with Stark I and II (anti-referral statutes), the Federal HMO Act, Medicare and Medicaid laws and their Anti-Fraud and Abuse Amendments, EMTALA (Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act), and HCQIA (Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986), practitioners also have access to the Qui Tam (Whistle Blower) Actions, False Claims Act, Clayton Act, RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations), the Sherman Act, and the McCarran Ferguson Act (insurance antitrust).
Pursuant to the McCarran Ferguson Act, the Bankruptcy Court has no jurisdiction or authority over the assets or operations of Acceptance Insurance Company.