McCain-Feingold Act

McCain-Feingold Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 2002, that changed the way that campaigns for federal political offices are financed. It banned soft money contributions, which were unregulated, usually large, contributions to the national party committees, instead of individual candidates. It also required political advertisements to state what person or group paid for them.
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As (https://www.oyez.org/cases/2003/02-1674) the Supreme Court explained  in sustaining the McCain-Feingold Act's ban on soft money, "The evidence connects soft money to manipulations of the legislative calendar, leading to Congress's failure to enact, among other things, generic drug legislation, tort reform and tobacco legislation."
Meanwhile, provisions of the federal government's 2002 Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, aka the McCain-Feingold Act, have severely hampered fundraising by state and local party committees.
The Supreme Court had knocked back a provision of the McCain-Feingold Act that prohibited all corporations and unions from broadcasting electioneering communications.
Federal Election Commission that addressed campaign finance restrictions of the McCain-Feingold Act. The President chastised the Justices for the decision, and his comments were met with a standing ovation by the Democratic lawmakers.
The McCain-Feingold Act of 2002 was an attempt to seal the cracks.
There he was tasked with enforcing the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, more commonly known as the McCain-Feingold Act. After years of withstanding the ire of John McCain and other advocates of political speech regulation, Smith founded the nonprofit Center for Competitive Politics, whose mission is to "educate the public on the actual effects of money in politics."
That's due largely to the McCain-Feingold Act of 2002, which, as writer Gregory Millman notes, barred direct company contributions to federal candidates.
In these 12 essays with an introduction by Kerbel and a foreword by Howard Dean, some of the new movers and shakers describe the decline of progressivism and the new reasons to restart it, the causes of the general elections of 2004, the gender gap, the values dilemma, the art of seeking the common good, ways and means of crafting both policy and message without conflict or overlap, the infamous Section 527 loophole in the McCain-Feingold Act, communicating a progressive philosophy, teaching progressives to speak American, firing the consultants, and using technology for campaigns and political change.
In the wake of the Senate markup, Democrats now fear that Republicans-the overwhelming majority of whom opposed the initial McCain-Feingold act in 2002--are bent on eradicating such organizations as ACT in order to put the Democrats at a profound disadvantage in getting out the vote, as well as boosting the hard-money donation and spending limits to candidates and party committees to exploit the Republicans' advantage in the number of big-money donors.
Thanks to the McCain-Feingold Act, "soft" money contributions to political parties were reduced, but hard money contributions increased, as did soft spending by the so-called 527s, the independent organizations that raised huge sums and spent freely on advertising and get-out-the-vote efforts.
But two years ago, the McCain-Feingold Act prohibited parties from raising soft money, a goal long sought by liberal newspaper editorialists and good-government activists.