Material Goods

Material Goods

A somewhat derogatory term for goods and services, especially those considered unnecessary luxuries. The term is used most frequently by critics of capitalism and/or conspicuous consumption.
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Material good has its tax, and if it came without desert or sweat, has no root in me, and the next wind will blow it away.
Our growing preoccupation with material goods and the latest gadgets are to blame.
Investigating such diverse topics as the explosion of data about the natural world resulting from 17th-century advances in optics and the proliferation of material goods in prosperous Dutch homes, she contends that art offered the Dutch a way of bearing witness to ordinary experiences that was satisfying and also surprisingly Cartesian.
The country's poorest children were on the 'margins of society' and were missing out on the most basic material goods and social activities which most parents regard as essential to a happy childhood, researchers found.
And the report found just two per cent of those questioned believed material goods made them happy - compared to 25 per cent who valued holidays and leisure time most highly.
In chapter four, Eden contrasts the communism of material goods in Pythagoras and Plato's Republic with the communal ownership of only intellectual goods in Plato's Laws, Aristotle, and Cicero.
The drive to accumulate material goods also plays a key role in our collective dying.
Caudillos also commanded popularity and respect because of the material goods and benefits they conferred.
At least st)me declinists will concede that Americans have more material goods than ever, but they contend that it's only because we're working harder.
The Japanese, conversely, are sure to stumble unless they overcome their quaintly bounded appetites for material goods. The book outlines a vision of a society dedicated to endlessly escalating desire and acquisition as consumer demand and technology's productive capacity leapfrog each other ever onward.
Chapters are grouped in sections on the home, economy, intellectual life, material goods, politics, recreation, and religion.

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