Donor

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Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

donor

One who gives a gift.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abbreviations [alpha][beta]: Alpha beta BM: Bone marrow CB: Cord blood CBU: Cord blood units CD: Cluster of differentiation CMV: Cytomegalovirus DLI: Donor lymphocyte infusions EBV: Epstein Barr virus GF: Graft failure GVHD: Graft versus host disease GVL: Graft versus leukemia [gamma][delta]: Gamma delta G-CSF: Granulocyte colony stimulating factor HLA: Human leukocyte antigen HSCT: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation HSC: Hematopoietic stem cells MHC: Major histocompatibility complex MUD: Matched unrelated donor NK: Natural killer PBSC: Peripheral blood stem cells UCB: Umbilical cord blood TCR: T-cell receptor PLT: Platelets WBC: White blood cells.
Stiehm said that unmatched umbilical cord blood transplants are as good as bone marrow transplants from a parent or a matched unrelated donor "but not as good as a matched sibling transplant."
Prospective evaluation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation from matched related and matched unrelated donors in younger adults with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia: German-austrian trial AMLHD98A.
Thus, patients with common HLA alleles on conserved haplotypes are more likely to find matched unrelated donors than those with rare genotypes (12).
Importantly, EFS rates were similarly high for children who had received donations of matched sibling cells or fully matched unrelated umbilical cord blood (MSD or UCB, 81 percent), compared to EFS rates for patients transplanted with cells from matched unrelated donors (66 percent) or unmatched unrelated cord blood donors (68 percent).