mass production

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Related to Mass produced: Series production, Serial production

mass production

a method of organizing PRODUCTION whereby a component or product such as a motor car passes through a sequence of predetermined operations or processes which constitute a PRODUCTION LINE OR ASSEMBLY LINE. Mass production systems are used to make components or products in comparatively large quantities using specialized machines on a continuous basis. See PRODUCT-FOCUSED LAYOUT, PRODUCTION SCHEDULING, MASS CUSTOMIZATION.

mass production

the manufacture of a PRODUCT in very large quantities using continuous flow capital-intensive methods of production. Mass production is typically found in industries where the product supplied is highly standardized, which enables automated machinery and processes to be substituted for labour. Mass-production industries are usually characterized by high levels of SELLER CONCENTRATION, difficult CONDITIONS OF ENTRY and the exploitation of ECONOMIES OF SCALE, which results in low unit costs of supply Compare BATCH PRODUCTION. See PRODUCTION, AUTOMATION, COMPUTER.
References in periodicals archive ?
Boldly coloured pottery by Clarice Cliff was sold very cheaply in Woolworths, Rene Lalique's factory made glassware in the thousands, Doulton & Co and Wedgwood mass produced porcelain figurines, industrially moulded Bakelite radios were manufactured in huge quantities.
Now a master's student in Bridgeport's technology-management program, Saez says he liked the challenge of creating a design that would be appealing and cheaply mass produced. His is made of steel.
The PlasmaSync 61MP1 is anticipated to be the first plasma monitor with a 60+" screen size to be mass produced and delivered to the North American market in quantity.
Drawing on Frankfurt School theories that claim that a false consciousness pervades mass produced images, Hansen tells us that the "myth" of mobility and success idealized in Hollywood films did not exist.
For instance, Japanese lithographs and prints, which were mass produced and considered strictly commercial vehicles in their day, are now considered highly collectible art.
Each system is customized to customer specifications but mass produced on a single assembly line from standard components.