Marxism

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Marxism

The economic and social philosophy espousing free access to goods and services, the lack of distinction between classes, the lack of state or government, and common ownership (not state ownership) of the means of production. Marxism asserts that the proletariat (those with no access to capital but who provide most of the labor) will inevitably overthrow the capitalist class and that the state, after a brief period in which it controls the means of production, will fade away to create an ideal society. Marxism is a type of communism. It is named for 19th-century economic philosopher Karl Marx.
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From this, Laborem exercens derives a critique of classical and Marxist economics. That critique suggests that the tendency of both systems to posit an irreconcilable antimony between labor and capital invert the relationship between labor and capital and leads inevitably to amoral systems of economic regulation in which human dignity and economic justice might not be attained.
Even for experts who have worked long years in Vietnam and are familiar with Marxist economic terminology and centrally planned economies, the Vietnamese use of terms like "multi-component commodity economy" can be baffling (Huy, p.
There is a difference between profit and value, however, in the classical Marxist economics that Wells builds his work on.
The first signs of important new departures in Marxist economic thinking began to appear toward the end of the interwar years, i.e., the 1920s and 1930s; but on the whole this was a period in which Lenin's Imperialism was accepted as the last word on monopoly capitalism, and the rigid orthodoxy of Stalinism discouraged attempts to explore changing developments in the structure and functioning of contemporary capitalist economies.
Specifically, it confronts the dominant mainstream neoclassical economics with critical alternatives, including various strands of post-Keynesian economics, Marxist economics, institutional economics and analyses from feminist and ecological perspectives.
Building his argument, he describes how liberal economics, Keynesian economics and Marxist economics inform each other and how an integrated perspective leading to a political and moral economy of conflict prevention can work, the horizontal inequality approach and why certain theories of internal conflict are outdated, the structure and culture necessary for a social economy of conflict prevention, and how values, ethics and interests based on human rights can produce development.
Over ten years ago, in Maxine Berg's Political Economy in the Twentieth Century (London: Philip Allan, 1990), I began an article on Paul's work as follows: "Described by the Wall Street Journal as the 'Dean' of radical economics, Paul Sweezy has more than any other single person kept Marxist economics alive in North America" (131).
Broken to bits by the 1972 earthquake, ground to dust by nearly two decades of war and 11 years of Marxist economics, Managua is slowly, inexorably clawing its way into the 20th century, albeit just as the rest of the world is headed for the 21st.
This is the reconstruction of Marxist economics as a coherent body of thought, not a collection of quotations.
Without explaining the term, he frequently touted "the third way," a middle-of-the-road approach that includes Marxist economics and international usurpation of nationhood.
Thus Marxist spirituality has to be approached in the same critical "spirit" as Marxist economics or political theory.
John Roomer has written it, he says, "to present the lasting ideas of Marxist economics in a way that makes them accessible to readers today" (p.