Marxism

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Marxism

The economic and social philosophy espousing free access to goods and services, the lack of distinction between classes, the lack of state or government, and common ownership (not state ownership) of the means of production. Marxism asserts that the proletariat (those with no access to capital but who provide most of the labor) will inevitably overthrow the capitalist class and that the state, after a brief period in which it controls the means of production, will fade away to create an ideal society. Marxism is a type of communism. It is named for 19th-century economic philosopher Karl Marx.
References in periodicals archive ?
How can classical Marxist theory and the notion of class explain the revolt in a country like Libya where tribal relations are central to the dynamics of society or a country like Yemen where tribal and sectarian realities dominate every aspect of life or a country like Jordan where the loyalty of east-Jordanian tribes to the royal family is the decisive factor in politics?
(7) Going a little further, she acknowledged that 'it is undeniable that Marx has had a somewhat restrictive influence upon the free development of theory in the case of many of his pupils.' (8) But who was to be blamed for this stagnation in the development of Marxist theory? For Luxemburg, Marx has provided us with more than enough theoretical tools for the practical needs of class struggle.
While Pakulski and Waters highlight some weaknesses in classical Marxist theory, they rely upon a caricature of Marxist class theory by accusing it of 'inherent economic reductionism' (Pakulski and Waters, 1996: 44) and describing its self-perception is as 'a universal explanatory key to economic, cultural and political relations' (Pakulski and Waters, 1996: 28).
The book covers all the privations of imprisonment Luxemburg endured and her steely refusal to let it break her spirit, writing The Accumulation of Capital, or what the Epigoni have done with Marxist Theory. An Anti-critique whilst in prison.
The two-year-old is a half-sister to Frederick Engels, winner of last season's July Stakes and the founding father of Marxist theory.
"There's enthusiasm for Marxist theory as a tool for analysis," says Tim Hardy, author of U.K.-based blog "Beyond Clicktivism.
Precapitalist Modes of Production exudes the theoretical confidence of Marxism of its period, even in its opening sentence, stentorian in tenor: "This book is a work of Marxist theory." (1) It sought out controversy, not least in the claim that there could be no Asiatic mode of production, that feudalism did not depend on serfdom, that transition needed to be understood in a nonevolutionary manner, and so on.
The third chapter, "Bargaining: The Return of the Critique of Political Economy," is a "plea for a renewal of this central ingredient of Marxist theory." According to Zizek this is an aspect of cultural studies which has been sorely neglected as a result of postmodernism.
For three years she helped lead the organization, instructed comrades on Marxist theory and wrote for an underground newspaper.
Written in elegant, erudite, and impassioned prose, it offers a sophisticated, insightful and compelling re-working of the classical Marxist theory of labour/value primarily inflected through a post-colonial and transnational feminist standpoint as played out on Filipino women's bodies and Filipino landscape under the powerful and alluring sway of capitalist globalization.
For example, the chapter on the Marxist perspective offer this introduction: The philosophy that grounds Marxist theory is materialism.
For the first time, Gramsci's intellectual reasoning about the workings of society, and means of Marxist theory and practice that can be successfully applied to the details of life, are available to readers everywhere in English.