Martin S. Feldstein

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Martin S. Feldstein

An American economist. He was a prominent economic adviser to President Ronald Reagan, though the two disagreed on the increasing deficit. He served as president of the National Bureau of Economic Research from 1978 to 2008. Feldstein was born in 1939.
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In fact, just last June 11, 2019, one of my school mates then, the famous Martin Feldstein, just passed away.
Martin Feldstein, president of the NBER for nearly 30 years, George F.
by Martin Feldstein The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, US.
Martin Feldstein discussed the possibilities for tax reform (his speech was given a few days before the Trump Administration released its framework).
Martin Feldstein effectively dismantles Piketty's numbers when he points out that his analysis of income using tax returns fails to take into account the way that changes in tax law led to "tax data [that] signaled an increase in measured income inequality even though there was no change in real inequality" ("Piketty's Numbers Don't Add Up," Wall Street Journal, May 14, 2014).
The group of senior Republicans includes former Secretary of State James Baker, former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and former Secretary of State George Shultz and has the backing of economists like Martin Feldstein and N.
At the other end, Martin Feldstein estimated $609 billion in deadweight losses with the payroll tax and $388 billion without.
Martin Feldstein of the National Bureau of Economics Research, 1989
But the rise in the long-term price of Brent, the main world benchmark, is arguably a more significant milestone for the global economy.Six years ago, former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and economist Martin Feldstein warned in the New York Times that the tripling of oil prices from 2001 to 2008 represented the "largest transfer of wealth in human history." They fretted that prolonged high prices would cut living standards, create an unfavourable balance of payments and stoke inflation in advanced economies, foment political unrest in poor countries, and give petrostates undue political influence.Yet despite persistent $100 crude, global GDP growth has ticked along at a rate of 2 per cent to 4 per cent annually since 2010.
The Harvard economist Martin Feldstein explained in 1999 why over-relying on this measure is a mistake.
Auerbach, Raj Chetty, Martin Feldstein, and Emmanuel Saez
"2014 is going to be a better year," Martin Feldstein, a professor at Harvard University and chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Ronald Reagan, said on Saturday in Philadelphia.