marketing myopia

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marketing myopia

the tendency for firms to take a narrow view of the MARKETS they currently serve based upon their present product offerings and thus to ignore broader market opportunities. For example, a producer who viewed his market solely as that for ‘potato crisps’ would be ignoring the potential for selling related products into the much broader ‘snack products’ market. See PRODUCT-MARKET MATRIX.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
Many don't see the value in constructing messages that link sustainability efforts to customer values, which leads to one of the biggest challenges in sustainability marketing: sustainability marketing myopia.
Just as an excessive focus on product attributes leads to marketing myopia, an exaggerated emphasis on its sustainability attributes over core consumer values leads to sustainability marketing myopia. It creates an imbalance in the marketing process and causes brands to run the risk of getting confined to a niche.
"Marketing Myopia." Harvard Business Review 38 (July/August): 45-56.
"Almost" because Eckerd started on its road to recovery just a year ago, a victim of mismanagement and marketing myopia.
That was an argument Theodore Levitt made in his classic 1975 article on marketing myopia. He maintained that companies should look beyond the basic function of what they are doing and determine what the customer really wants.
Not only have they initiated creative ways to revive their transportation mode, but they have overcome Levitt's charge of railroad marketing myopia. As the industry nears its 200th birthday, small railroaders are showing themselves to be farsighted indeed.
In an important business articles, Theodore Levitt (1960) described a phenomenon he labeled as "marketing myopia." Firms suffering from marketing myopia define their businesses in terms of a product rather than a need or a benefit that customers seek.
Marketing myopia. Harvard Business Review, 53(5), 26-37.
As Don Marsh said, "We can now face tomorrow with the information of today and slay the dragons of half-knowledge, customary habit and marketing myopia."
In 1960, Levitt wrote an article which appeared in the Harvard Business Review titled "Marketing Myopia." The article served as a thought-provoking milestone.
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