Marketable Good

(redirected from Marketable Goods)

Marketable Good

A good that can be easily bought or sold with little or no impact on price. Examples of marketable goods include stocks in blue chip companies and U.S. Treasury securities. On exchanges, marketable goods usually have low bid-ask spreads.
References in periodicals archive ?
Menger understands money as evolving in a process of selection from the most marketable goods to a few and finally one good that comes to be used as the most common medium of exchange.
process of creating wealth through the mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and natural resources to generate marketable goods and services.
He emphasised the need to work as a group in order to produce marketable goods, adding that cooperatives were ideal to grow businesses.
Contract awarded for Marketable goods purchased second club to submit a quote for a small number of advertisements
(1) The social product, here, broadly defined, includes not only marketable goods but also the general quality of life through climate, the range of public services, cultural offerings, and the provision of law and order.
So, increasingly, we shall be supporting businesses that show they can grapple with the task of transforming ideas into marketable goods and services - one of the big economic challenges of the 21st century.
Not only that the benefits through a higher degree of specialization will occur only in the future contingent on the appearance of new marketable goods, but also this development is taken as not affected by the improvement in the transaction efficiency of an individual herself.
In order for developing countries and transition economies to increase their participation in global trade, they need to focus on three export prerequisites: market access, marketable goods and services to export and export skills.
In addition to a fee, or in lieu of such direct payment, an artist might receive living expenses, for example, or marketable goods or property (120).
For one thing, the traditional relationship between artists and patrons was broken: Instead, "paintings were marketable goods which competed for the attention of the buyer." Art dealers appeared, buying painters' works and commissioning them to do more.
Without interfering with their colour combinations and designs, she taught them how to produce marketable goods by using sewing machines, straight seams and new cloth and foam.
The culture and the demonstration effect for marketable goods come as a package.