currency

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Related to Market currency: Exchange rates

Currency

Currency

Money generally accepted in circulation in a certain jurisdiction. That is, currency is any form of money that businesses in a certain jurisdiction will accept in exchange for goods and services. Usually, the domestic government sets its own currency and provides penalties to persons and businesses in its jurisdiction that do not accept it. However, some countries (especially those experiencing hyperinflation) accept other countries' currencies informally. Alternatively, a country may use the currency of another (as some countries have done with the U.S. dollar) or pool resources to make an international currency accepted in several countries (the euro being the most prominent example). See also: Foreign exchange.

currency

or

cash

the coins and bank notes which constitute the physical component of a country's MONEY SUPPLY, i.e. coins and notes have a physical identity, whereas the other assets comprising the money supply such as bank deposits, are book-keeping entries and have no tangible life of their own. See LEGAL TENDER, FOREIGN CURRENCY.

currency

the BANK NOTES and coins issued by the monetary authorities that form part of an economy's MONEY SUPPLY. The term currency’ is often used interchangeably with the term cash in economic analysis and monetary policy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lira extended its losing streak to a third day this week, becoming the worst-performing emerging market currency so far this year.
The goal of Adaptive Proxy Hedging is to provide a hedging vehicle solution that closely tracks the exchange rate of the underlying emerging market currency.
Therefore, the prospect that the Federal Reserve will cut-off these flows of funds has resulted in emerging market currency volatility, which has been yet another reminder of the risks and the potentially destabilising and negative effects that policies and shocks in major economies can have on other countries and regions.