Piracy

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Piracy

1. Robbery committed at sea. Piracy is one of the world's oldest crimes and is a risk in international trade. Captured pirates generally are tried in military courts. A company may insure against injury or loss of goods due to piracy.

2. The act or practice of making illegal copies of copyrighted material. For example, printing copies of a book without the author's or publisher's permission may be piracy because neither receives any compensation for sales. Piracy is a major issue in online commerce. It is common, for instance, for a private user to upload a video to a website and even profit from views of that video without permission from or compensation to the copyright owners. The best way to prevent or prosecute this form of piracy remains a controversial issue.
References in periodicals archive ?
dissertation, this study analyzes the role and effectiveness of judicial institutions in combating maritime terrorism and enhancing maritime security.
I would suggest that in comparison to the attacks in land environment, maritime terrorism requires less commonly held skill sets and equipment and is probably comparatively easier to succeed," he said.
The question asked related to the comparison of piracy and maritime terrorism to animals that are endowed with specific characteristics.
Today a range of maritime security issues are of concern to governments in Southeast Asia, including contested maritime borders, smuggling, piracy, maritime terrorism and illegal fishing.
It has been fairly active in countering threats of maritime terrorism.
Phnom Penh, July 12 ( ANI ): Asserting that evolving asymmetric threats in the form of maritime terrorism, piracy and drug trafficking have made maritime security issues a strategic priority, External Affairs Minister S.
The rise of Somali piracy has renewed concerns about maritime terrorism around the Horn of Africa.
Maritime security mainly concerns the safety of navigation, the cracking down on transnational crimes including sea piracy and maritime terrorism, and conflict prevention and resolution.
These troops, whose job is to combat maritime terrorism and piracy, must successfully complete hostile water rescues to qualify.
His book sets out to answer questions surrounding the form of contemporary piracy and the nature of maritime terrorism, as well as their similarities and alleged links.
The introduction by Ong sets out an agenda, highlighting the existence of maritime terrorism as an additional modern factor, and the IMB's broad definition of piracy to include incidents within territorial waters, from a quay, or perpetrated by government naval craft.
For example, the Coast Guard reported an improvement in reducing the maritime terrorism risk but reported a decline in the percentage of time that Coast Guard assets met designated combat readiness levels.

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