tax rate

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Tax rate

The percentage of tax paid for different levels of income.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Tax Rate

A percentage of one's income that one must pay in taxes. Tax rates vary according to incomes. That is, one who makes $100,000 per year usually has a higher tax rate than one who makes $25,000. See also: Marginal tax rate, Average tax rate.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

tax rate

The proportional amount of taxes paid on a given income or the given dollar value of an asset. If the tax is calculated on the basis of total income, it is the average tax rate. If the tax is calculated only on extra units of income, the rate is the marginal tax rate.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

tax rate

the percentage rate at which a TAX is levied on income or expenditure. Tax rates are varied by government on social grounds (to redistribute income) and, as part of FISCAL POLICY, to increase or decrease spending.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

tax rate

The percentage used to calculate various taxes.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, 70% isn't even close to the highest marginal tax rate in our history.
Table 5 illustrates the situation for an individual, where effective marginal tax rates that can lead to the inactivity trap are monitored, or in other words, when high values demotivate a person from seeking employment because it is economically more preferable to receive social benefits.
In any event, the pattern of changes in the effective marginal tax rates would be similar under the different possible assumptions.
Highest tax rate is the highest marginal tax rate. Lowest tax rate is the lowest marginal tax rate.
Cruz's plan would significantly reduce marginal tax rates and the cost of capital, which would lead to a 13.9% higher GDP over the long term, provided that the tax cut could be appropriately financed.
Highly variable marginal tax rates make optimal financial planning difficult.
The range of tax rates is also quite wide, from a low of -4.63% in Mexico in 2000 to a high of 51.48% in Denmark in 2000, for average tax rates, and from a low of 7% in Chile for most of the period to a high of 69.5% in Hungary in 2004 and 2005, for marginal tax rates. The mean values for both marginal and average tax rates tend to be high.
The World Bank follows the methodology proposed by Koester and Kormendi (1989) to calculate the marginal tax rates by running rolling regressions between tax revenues and per capita income.
However, Padovano and Galli (2001) estimated effective marginal tax rates by regressing total government revenues on gross domestic product, over 10-year intervals; the coefficient then yields the change in revenue for a one-dollar change in output.
Because of this difference, the benefits of tax deferral cannot be calculated in the same manner used to determine the benefits of an exclusion or deduction -- i.e., by simply multiplying the amount of the exclusion or deduction by the individual's marginal tax rate. For tax-deferred retirement investments, according to the study, the benefits calculation is not just a function of the individual's marginal tax rate.
Income taxes are typically raised by increasing marginal tax rates. However, the relationship between changes in marginal tax rates and changes in income tax revenue are relatively weak.
A decrease in the marginal tax rate that raised the after-tax share of income by 1 percent raised reported taxable income by 0.2 percent.