MAR

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MAR

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Morocco. The code is used for transactions to and from Moroccan bank accounts and for international shipping to Morocco. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.
References in classic literature ?
Next to him, yellow-haired Menelaus son of Atreus rose and yoked his fleet horses, Agamemnon's mare Aethe, and his own horse Podargus.
There!" said Vronsky, going up to the mare and speaking soothingly to her.
That one I like best," he added, pointing to a dark bay mare, who was already giving her boy some trouble.
Jones, who affected to be surprised at nothing after his crushing experience with railroad freight rates on firweood and charcoal, betrayed no surprise now when the task was given to him to locate the purchaser of a certain sorrel mare.
When the Prince awoke and found that both the mare and the foal had disappeared, he bethought him at once of the eagle, and taking the feather out of his pocket he blew it into the air.
He ran beside the mare, ran in front of her, saw her being whipped across the eyes, right in the eyes!
Lute looked on, astounded at the unprecedented conduct of her mare, and admiring her lover's horsemanship.
Higginbotham's), Dominicus rose in the gray of the morning, put the little mare into the green cart, and trotted swiftly away towards Parker's Falls.
Of course, the short cut was the long way round; and it was nearly dark when that unlucky mare and I saw the single street of Yea.
When the traveller came up with them he saluted them courteously, and spurring his mare was passing them without stopping, but Don Quixote called out to him, "Gallant sir, if so be your worship is going our road, and has no occasion for speed, it would be a pleasure to me if we were to join company."
This journey was performed upon an old grey mare, concerning whom John had an indistinct set of ideas hovering about him, to the effect that she could win a plate or cup if she tried.
If any bagman of that day could have caught sight of the little neck-or-nothing sort of gig, with a clay- coloured body and red wheels, and the vixenish, ill tempered, fast-going bay mare, that looked like a cross between a butcher's horse and a twopenny post-office pony, he would have known at once, that this traveller could have been no other than Tom Smart, of the great house of Bilson and Slum, Cateaton Street, City.