BEL

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Related to Marduk: Tiamat

BEL

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Belgium. The code is used for transactions to and from Belgian bank accounts and for international shipping to Belgium. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Enuma elis is fundamentally a story about the rise of Marduk. By telling how the god of Babylon came to be the king of the whole pantheon, the poem gives the city a god worthy of its new role as a political and religious capital.
A statement from the Globe shared on Facebook on Thursday said: "Unfortunately, it's come to our attention that Infernal War, a touring support act on the Marduk show at The Globe earlier this week are alleged to have links to, or share Neo-Nazi and fascist beliefs.
The trend started from the death of old Tiamat- a large fish or a giant monster who ruled Babylon and the creator of universe- by Marduk, the young god of Babylon (10).
En Lucas-Hechos ya no se trata de Marduk sino de cualquier fuerza espiritual o politica que se opone al avance del Evangelio de Jesus resucitado (Hch 4,2-24).
Babylonian priests chose Marduk, which also was the god of the sky and the Earth during the Neo-Babylonian Empire.
Dualismo, donde, por un lado, hay dominio de lo invisible, del pensamiento primario y original y el visible y corporal, entre estos, mediaba el artesano creador--a la manera de Marduk o Yahve--, aquel Demiurgo que crea haciendo.
Consultado acerca de las acusaciones que se han hecho en contra de la cienciologia, el vocero de la organizacion, Jonathan Marduk, sostiene:
(24.) The Hebrew people directly confront this problem in the book of Genesis, where, in the first creation account, the "seven days" of creation contrast the "seven eons" of the Babylonian narrative about Tiamat and Marduk in the Enuma Elish.
In particular, he resists the temptation of systematizing the pantheons into neat structures, and he discusses the specific relationships between geographical places and/or royal powers and certain gods (e.g., Amun in Karnak and Marduk in Babylon).
Also included is a DVD containing digital images of works in the Metropolitan Museum's collection and an interactive storybook: Marduk, King of the Gods.
Calling himself the "great restorer and builder of holy places," he also reconstructed Etemenanki, a 7-story, almost 300-foot-high temple (also known as a ziggurat) dedicated to the god Marduk.