Hemorrhagic Fever

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Related to Marburg virus: Ebola virus

Hemorrhagic Fever

Any virus that causes both fever and excessive bleeding due to the reduced ability of blood to coagulate. Hemorrhagic fevers are spread from person to person through respiration. As such, there is concern that hemorrhagic fevers have potential in bioweapons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stakeholders from the district and chiefdom engagements thanked the Ministry of Health and Sanitation and Partners for the early communication, as they are now aware that the Marburg Virus is in bats.
Viral isolation from a common species of fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) in Gabon has shown bats to be a primary reservoir host for the Marburg virus. (31)
The Marburg virus is part of the family of hemorrhagic fever viruses that includes Ebola.
Gbawuru Mansaray was speaking at a district stakeholders meeting held by the Ministry of Health and Sanitation and partners in Kabala Town, which was geared to orientate stakeholders on the recent discovery of the Marburg Virus.
As a 23-year-old journalist, I covered the 2005 outbreak of the Ebola-like Marburg virus in the northern Angola.
Additionally, the D-peptide target is >95% conserved across all filoviruses, opening the possibility that this class of inhibitors will also be effective against the closely related Marburg virus."
The differential diagnosis includes malaria, typhoid, Lassa fever, meningococcal disease, influenza, and Marburg virus.
Kampala, Muharram 18, 1436, November 11, 2014, SPA -- Uganda is free of the Ebola-like Marburg virus, which
The cause of death was Marburg virus disease, and two secondary cases (neither fatal) were identified and managed.
A further collaboration with Paul Rennert, Ph.D., at Biogen Idec, a biotech company based in Cambridge, Mass., provided the team with antibodies targeted to TIM-1 and the team found that one of these antibodies, ARD5, very effectively blocks Ebola and Marburg virus entry into cells.
The findings, appearing in the July Emerging Infectious Diseases, suggest that African villagers, health officials and laboratory workers who come into contact with the often deadly Marburg virus will someday have a way to fend it off.
Angola is currently experiencing the world's largest recorded outbreak of the Marburg virus, with more than 400 cases since January.