Maquiladora

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Related to Maquiladora Industry: Maquiladores

Maquiladora

A factory in Mexico established by a U.S. company to make finished products and ship them to the United States. Maquiladoras are close to the U.S. border with Mexico. They are controversial in the United States because they are thought to take away jobs from Americans who otherwise would have manufactured the products. They are also controversial in Mexico because they are thought to exploit Mexican workers. NAFTA made maquiladoras more cost effective. In the mid-2000s, maquiladoras accounted for more than half of U.S.-Mexican trade. A maquiladora is also called a maquila.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the foregoing, the maquiladora industry is an important part of the economies on both sides of the border, with more than a million workers in this industry.
To solve this problem, in this article the main research objective is to identify the critical success activities of SMED in the maquiladora industry of Ciudad Juarez.
The recent case study of a U.S.-Mexico border chemical plant offers us a more in-depth view on environmental injustice related to the maquiladora industry. Oscar Morales et al.
"The Maquiladora Industry and Environmental Degradation in the United States-Mexican Borderlands." National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade.
The foregoing was the basis for the construction of instruments that were validated through a multidisciplinary review, as is the case of the specialists in the fields of economics, management and engineering, and specialized interviews that provided information on factors and actions that are related to the competitiveness of the maquiladora industry of the electronics sector, thus creating a methodology with the triple helix approach of Etzkowitz and Leydesforff (2000), but with an evolution toward a methodology adapted to contemporary reality called Fifth Systemic Helix (FSH).
NAFTA rules for the maquiladora industry were implemented in two phases, with the first phase covering the period 1994-2000, and the second phase starting in 2001.
This is particularly relevant for the maquiladora industry, since 90 per cent of the inputs it utilizes are imported, which implies that this industry's indirect effects on employment are almost trivial.
Nonetheless, critics of export-led development still refer to the maquiladora industry as an industry with low wages, disarticulation of production, and few backward and forward linkages.
Another thing that I believe is part of the violence in Juarez is the fact that for several generations now the export industries, the maquiladora industry, has essentially been the foundation of the formal economy in Juarez, you know, the legal economy.
(1990), The Maquiladora Industry: Economic Solution or Problem?, New York: Praeger.
It is important to note that there are other factors that may have influenced the slowdown in the maquiladora industry. For example, Hanson and Robertson (2003) and Gerber and Carrillo (2002) discuss the contraction of external demand due to the U.S.
Mexico's maquiladora industry: Where strategic resource management makes a difference.