Issue

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Issue

A particular financial asset.

Issue

A set of securities that a company or government offers for sale. That is, when a company sells stocks or bonds to the public (or offers them for private placement) the collection of stocks or bonds is said to be an issue. If the company or government is selling a set for the first time, it is said to be making a new issue. Typically, issues of securities may be bought and sold on the open market.

issue

A particular grouping of an organization's securities. For example, General Motors has a number of different issues of preferred stock listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

issue

To sell securities in the primary market. For example, in late 1996, Florida Panthers Holdings, Inc., owner of the NHL hockey team, issued 2,700,000 Class A shares of common stock at a price of $10 per share.

Issue.

When a corporation offers a stock or bond for sale, or a government offers a bond, the security is known as an issue, and the company or government is the issuer.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this context only those persons should migrate whose family is in custody of their parents and brothers as they can look after the migrants' families left behind particularly the male issues who are studying at high school and college level.
In addition to various books that document the apparent malaise of contemporary men, recent media representation of male issues is more often than not couched in a language of crisis, loss, pain, and disenfranchisement (see McDowell, 2003; Robinson, 2000).
They discuss female and male issues and offer a sexual dysfunction assessment and guide on how to approach sexual health in the renal setting.
"To some degree, I'm uncomfortable with using the language that emphasizes the Black boys or men," Moses said of the rising mainstream and conservative interest in Black male issues. "It's as if the Black man's got an illness, and we need to cure him, fit him into some category and make him functional in society.
The group's activities include a class with Sewell on Black male issues and another with a different instructor on critical thinking.
We considered gender an inclusive term that would invite a range of research into female and male issues. The articles included in this issue reflect the broad nature of the term gender (relating to such concepts as sex, gender identity, gender roles, gender stereotypes, masculinity/femininity, etc.), and in some unexpected ways.
The cloaking of female issues under a "gender-sensitive" caption seems a bit limiting, and male issues necessitate much greater attention in the classroom.