Democracy

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Democracy

Self-rule in a polity. In a democracy, the citizens vote on issues of governance. Often, the term also refers to a republic, in which citizens elect representatives who vote on issues of governance, but the two terms are not identical.
References in periodicals archive ?
that minorities in a majoritarian democracy protect their rights by
[[alpha].sub.i] captures country-specific fixed effects, [D.sub.it] is a dummy variable measure of majoritarian political institutions (where [MAJ.sub.it] = 1 in country years of majoritarian democracy and [MAJ.sub.it] = 0 otherwise), and [X.sub.it] is a vector of control variables.
The hypothesis tested in the following Part is that electors themselves impose conditions of fairness, information and majoritarian democracy on constitutional change and that, in contrast with traditional models, deliberative democratic constitutional change can attract significant trust by accommodating each of these conditions.
explicit about seeing "majoritarian democracy" as the
For example, he considers an argument by Richard Wagner (the public-choice theorist, not the maestro of Bayreuth) that goes as follows: under majoritarian democracy, groups A and B have an incentive to vote for taxing away the earnings of C; groups B and C then have an incentive to form a new coalition against A, and so on in an endless cycle of forced transfers.
Whereas the idea that advertisements subvert civic life is a staple of green political theory, Behan's advocacy of national majoritarian democracy is unusual and intriguing; would-be eco-politicians usually trumpet decentralized, fully participatory democracy.
It might be a lesser grade of majoritarian democracy, and many might like things that way - for a while.
One shortcoming of present studies is the typical conclusion reached when the transition to liberal majoritarian democracy flounders.
Pursuit of social justice, or any other kind of justice, through legal process differs from its pursuit through majoritarian democracy. Government by lawyers involves different "conversations" -- contentions, arguments, considerations, modes of decision, means of avoiding decision.
Rothchild considers the matrix of majoritarian democracy, elite power sharing, populism and corporatism.
First he gives a general defence of majoritarian democracy; then he argues that the specific form of democracy that best fits this defence gives a standing priority to policies that provide all citizens with "mutual perceived benefits", or that secure what Martin defines as "civil" rights.
In their view sanctions are another aspect of the general proliferation of special interest politics in majoritarian democracy. Sanctions emerge endogenously from the same clash of interests that motivates public choice modelling of other redistributive government policies.