Democracy

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Democracy

Self-rule in a polity. In a democracy, the citizens vote on issues of governance. Often, the term also refers to a republic, in which citizens elect representatives who vote on issues of governance, but the two terms are not identical.
References in periodicals archive ?
This key critical test asks the question, How has the shift to majoritarian democracy affected growth, particularly when compared to countries' developmental autocracies?
The value options presented in the poll were those examined above: majoritarian democracy, fairness and well-informed process.
Given that such cycling is understood a priori to be a likely consequence of majoritarian democracy, ruling majority coalition members may calculate that future majority coalition members may discriminate against them.
In contrast, leading KANU politicians, such as those presiding over the majimbo rallies of 1991, view the unitary state within a multiparty, majoritarian democracy as problematic, since it would shut out minority ethnic groups even if individual freedoms were guaranteed.
Pursuit of social justice, or any other kind of justice, through legal process differs from its pursuit through majoritarian democracy.
Rothchild considers the matrix of majoritarian democracy, elite power sharing, populism and corporatism.
In their view sanctions are another aspect of the general proliferation of special interest politics in majoritarian democracy.
A majoritarian democracy is sometimes described as an accountable form of government because it makes those who exercise public authority answer to the preferences of the majority of adult citizens, as registered periodically during elections.
Sinhala Only distorted democracy by recasting it as government of, by and for the 'chosen people', chosen on the basis of a primordial identity, thereby enabling the transformation of Lankan polity from a pluralist democracy into a majoritarian democracy.
And it raises the troubling question of how the government will respond if a future majoritarian democracy calls for the espousal of illiberal and even undemocratic values and principles.
Oakeshott and Hayek are sceptical of both bills of rights and majoritarian democracy.
New Labour is currently engaged in what amounts to a full-blooded constitutional revolution, dragging the political system away from an extreme version of majoritarian democracy towards a more institutionally consensual model'.