mainframe

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mainframe

a large-scale COMPUTER with big data-storage facilities which is often accessible simultaneously from many terminals. Mainframe computers are used by large data-processing departments in businesses for sales and purchase ledger record-keeping, etc.

As MICROCOMPUTERS and MINICOMPUTERS become more powerful in terms of data-processing, speed and data-storage capacity, the distinction between the three types of computer has become blurred.

References in periodicals archive ?
There's a mainframe connection here, too -- Red Hat offers a version of its Enterprise Linux operating system for IBM's mainframes.
In your opinion, why are businesses who are running mainframes not yet implementing multi-factor authentication (MFA)?
Mainframes also falls victim to lack of tools and talent to configure security controls or implement upgrades.
Compuware is addressing the critical need to leverage modern Agile and DevOps best practices for the mainframe by making its innovative solutions available to enterprise customers via Amazon Web Services (AWS).
"Mainframes play a key role in digital business as many digital applications are based on mobile or handheld-device access to data stored on the mainframe.
Despite being around for decades, mainframe servers continue to play an important role in the IT infrastructure of many top companies spanning all verticals.
M2 EQUITYBITES-August 18, 2015-IBM introduces Linux-only mainframe
Compuware Corporation (NASDAQ: CPWR) said it has published a white paper entitled "Mainframe Excellence 2025: A Generational Call for Strategic Platform Stewardship."
India, March 11 -- 590 CIOs and IT directors polled from nine countries around the globe estimate it would take an average of $11 million to bring their outdated mainframe applications up to date - an increase of almost a third (29%) from May 2012 when the figure stood at $8.5 million.
An IT services company in China has picked an IBM mainframe to provide online services for up to 300 million citizens, including many in rural areas who will access the services through kiosks in community centers and other public places, IBM said.
Semerjian listed three challenges he had repeatedly heard: controlling costs, maintaining skillsets as the older workforce retires and increasing the agility of the mainframes.