mail order

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mail order

a DIRECT MARKETING means of retailing products to consumers through the post. Mail order firms supply catalogues to prospective customers who either themselves or through agents make purchases for delivery to their homes. Mail order concerns typically combine wholesaling (stocking large quantities of products and breaking bulk) and retailing functions, supplying customers from a central warehouse. Such firms compete mainly by offering customers convenience (i.e. home shopping) and by the provision of INSTALMENT CREDIT facilities on purchases. Mail order methods may also be used to sell industrial products. See RETAILER, WHOLESALER, DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL.

mail order

a form of WHOLESALER/ RETAILER operation that is involved in the sale of products to consumers through the post. The mail order firm appoints agents whose task it is to canvas potential customers. Customers are supplied with a catalogue from which they make purchases directly through the post, by telephone or through their agent. See DIRECT SELLING/MARKETING.
References in periodicals archive ?
"When I began my mail-order business in 1951, I was a newly married bride and pregnant with my first son, Fred," Vernon recalls.
I searched for that special product that would put me into the mail-order business. I was ready but did not know where to start."
Initially begun in 1984, the company's mail-order business was ramped up in 1991 with the establishment of its subsidiary company, Walgreens Healthcare Plus Inc.
Whether the fabrics are meant to pique the consumer's interest in the retailer's stores such as with Laura Ashley's Home book and to some extent the Calico Corner catalogs, or to generate strictly mail-order business, fabrics are being used to allure.
THE world's biggest record store chain is aiming for a bigger slice of Britain's pounds 1.5 billion music market by launching a mail-order business.
Retail pharmacy lost the mail-order business to PBMs because of somewhat myopic operating beliefs.
Industry sources peg the size of the mail-order business at between 5 percent and 10 percent of the sell-through market.
Long the leader in retail sales of prescription drugs, the company is committed to developing its mail-order business.
In denying a petition for more stringent regulation of the industry, Konnor notes, the Food and Drug Administration ruled in November that the $2.5 billion mail-order business is within the traditional practice of pharmacy.
mail-order businesses will not be required to act as the state's agent in collecting use tax.