Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act


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Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1975, that gave the Federal Trade Commission the authority to enforce warranties on consumer goods. The Act does not require goods to carry warranties, but rather states that companies must honor the warranties that they issue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently the fine folks at the FTC have decreed that the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act also applies to electronics hardware--more precisely, to the warranties for electronics hardware.
Steverson & Aaron Munter, Then and Now: Reviving the Promise of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, 63 U.
The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is the federal law governing written warranties on consumer products and is overseen by the Federal Trade Commission.
If you live in a state that doesn't have strong lemon laws, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is a federal law that applies to defective vehicles.
(How much do you know about the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act and its records retention implications?) A research section containing the text of the laws under discussion follows the monographs contained in the Guide to Records Retention.
The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (22) (MMWA) states that when a supplier (23) provides a "written warranty" or enters into a "service contract," and the MMWA otherwise applies, that party cannot disclaim implied warranties.
federal and state consumer protection laws, such as the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, do not apply.
The Federal Trade Commission Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975 delineates guidelines for development of written warranties.
Currently, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act does not included explicit disclosure rules and wording guidelines for extended warranties.
Under another federal law, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, you have a right to see a copy of the dealer's warranty before a purchase.
Unless warrantors provide the parts or services for free or receive a waiver from the FTC, such statements generally are prohibited by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, a law that governs consumer product warranties.
The agency said that these types of messages are in violation of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which prohibits companies from putting repair limits on warranties, and they may also violate rules against false representation.