Luddite

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Luddite

A term for workers in the early 19th century in Britain who opposed the Industrial Revolution because increased mechanization was changing the economy and leaving them without jobs. The term has come to mean any person who opposes technological changes, especially those that impact the economy.
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(57) The parallel to Hargreaves who, after his first workshop was wrecked, moved to an area noted for its machine-breaking propensities is stark.
A final occurrence of machine-breaking in 1789 took place in southern Champagne.
Continued machine-breaking in other areas during the early years of the Revolution only served to spread the attitudes adopted by the entrepreneurs and officials of Troyes.
The massive outbreak of machine-breaking in 1789 was part of the dramatic transformation of the "threat from below" from the realm of rebelliousness into something new: modern revolutionary politics.
Yet after 1791, machine-breaking was almost completely unknown in France until the Restoration (1814-30), in spite of the survival of organized groups of labourers, repeated and determined government efforts to create and adopt new technologies, and the boom and bust economic cycles of the revolutionary era.
Although contemporary to English Luddism, in its French incarnation, machine-breaking in the 19th century serves mostly to highlight the importance of what came earlier.
The importance of the gap of twenty-plus years separating the major incidences of machine-breaking in England and France cannot be underestimated.
Thomis, The Luddites: Machine-Breaking in Regency England (Hamden, CT 1970), 16.