Arpanet

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Arpanet

The first digital network that utilized packet switching, which is the transmission of data, regardless of content, in manageable chunks called packets. This was a revolutionary technology and ultimately led to the creation of the modern Internet. It was developed in the 1960s by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
The military network, known as Milnet, will be used to interconnect classified computer sites; the otherk, R&Dnet, will serve unclassified sites only.
Drilling will test 100-metre step-outs from the Milnet 1,500 Zone and shallower targets beneath and near the past-producing Milnet Mine.
The Milnet Mine reported past production of 157,130 tons averaging 2.25 g/t platinum, 2.98 g/t palladium, 0.93 g/t gold, 1.49 per cent nickel, and 1.54 per cent copper.
Army Communications, Electronics Command ATTN: AMSEL-RD-SE-CRM (Kay Trezza), Fort Monmouth, NY 07703-5000, MILNET: AMSEL-RD-LC-COM@CECOM-1.arp.
On November 29, 1988, someone exploiting a security flaw present in older versions of the FTP file transfer program broke into a machine on the MILNET. The intruder was traced to a machine on the Arpanet, and to immediately prevent further access, the MILNET/Arpanet links were severed.
The purpose of CERT is to act as a central switchboard and coordinator for computer security emergencies on Arpanet and MILnet computers.
Russ Mundy of the Defense Communications Agency reported at the NCSC meeting that the MILNET to ARPANET mailbridges were shut down at 11:30 a.m.
Medin also informed us that DCA had shut down the mailbridges which serve as gateways between the MILNET and the ARPANET.
The RISKS digest is distributed electronically to individuals and redistribution centers via major computer networks, including ARPANET, MILNET, CSNET, USENET, and BITNET, and reaches Europe and Australia.
In August 1986, we discovered someone was breaking into Lawrence Berkeley Lab's (LBL) computers, becoming superuser, and then attacking other MILNET sites.
Soon afterwards, a message from the National Computer Security Center arrived, reporting that someone from our laboratory had attempted to break into one of their computers through a MILNET connection.
Within a few weeks, we noticed him exploring our network connections--using ARPANET and MILNET quite handily, but frequently needing help with lesser known networks.