deficiency

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Deficiency

The amount by which a project's cash flow is not adequate to meet debt service.

Deficiency

1. The amount by which cash flow falls short of debt service. For example, if a company has $300,000 in current liabilities and only $250,000 in cash flow for a given year, its deficiency is $50,000.

2. In taxation, the amount by which one's tax liability exceeds what the individual person or organization reported. For example, if the IRS disallows certain deductions that the taxpayer applied, he/she will owe more in taxes than he/she reported on the return. Deficiency is the amount this taxpayer still owes to the IRS.

deficiency

1. The amount by which an individual's or an organization's tax liability as computed by the Internal Revenue Service exceeds the tax liability reported by the taxpayer.
2. The amount by which a firm's liabilities exceed assets.

deficiency

The amount due on a mortgage loan after adding all expenses of foreclosure and accrued interest to the principal balance of the loan and then deducting the sale price or lender-bid price for the property. The balance remaining, if any, may be collected by the lender by means of taking a deficiency judgment, unless prohibited by law or contract. Deficiency judgments may be collected just like any other judgment, through seizure of other assets or garnishment. There are two circumstances when a lender may not collect any deficiency:

1. In states with consumer protection statutes that outlaw deficiencies on first mortgages on a borrower's principal residence.

2. With mortgage loans designated as nonrecourse, meaning the lender and borrower agreed in advance that the property would stand for the debt and there would be no deficiency allowed in the event of foreclosure.

References in periodicals archive ?
"He has MCADD, so he needs to eat to have enough energy.
Kay remembers when she first searched "MCADD" online, the top hit was a memorial site.
Our data confirm the high incidence of MCADD due to the sensibility and reliability of acylcarnitines analysis by LCMS/MS analysis, making possible early specific therapies that can prevent possible crises in at-risk infants.
Molecular studies supported by in silico analysis can be important to confirm the MCADD diagnosis.
The base case analysis for MCADD demonstrates that with a prevalence of 1:17,000, and sensitivity, specificity, and cost for initial, repeat, and confirmatory testing as outlined in Table 1, the expected number of cases of MCADD per 100,000 newborns is 5.6, with approximately 140 false-positive results.
Applying the base care figures to the number of newborns screened in Maryland per year, the probable cases of MCADD per 70,000 newborns is approximately four.
These screening programs use different thresholds to define a positive screening result for MCADD owing to differences in screening criteria, health technologies, and case definitions (17).
However, there have been previous studies examining age variation in C8 concentrations among children with confirmed MCADD (1, 2, 4, 7), demonstrating that infants tested at <10 weeks of age have significantly higher (P < 0.05) C8 concentrations than those tested at later ages (2) and that a 3-fold decline of C8 concentrations is seen over the first weeks of life (11).
If untreated, MCADD can lead to seizures, cardiac arrest, mental retardation and even death.
Around one in 100 Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) deaths is probably a result of undiagnosed MCADD.
Patients were divided into 2 classes, the MCADD class, which included the 30 children with proven MCADD identified through neonatal screening.
For the identification of new markers for MCADD diagnosis, we chose a 3-step data mining approach.