LYON

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LYON

Liquid Yield Option Note

A convertible, callable, and putable zero-coupon bond. A LYON is a bond that is convertible to common stock and may be bought or sold as an option, but which does not pay interest. Because it pays no interest, it is issued at a considerable discount from par value of the bond. This guarantees a positive return to the investor, at least until such time as it becomes profitable for the investor to put the bond back to the issuing company for an amount over the issue price. Generally, the total return on a LYON is less than that of the company's common stock, assuming the company does well.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sous Auguste et Tibere, comme dans le Nord de la Meseta en general, l'essentiel de la masse monetaire en circulation correspond a des frappes hispano-romaines, le plus souvent issues des ateliers de la vallee de l'Ebre mais parfois plus lointaines, notamment pour l'argent egalement fourni par les ateliers de Lugdunum et de Rome qui ne fournissent pas de bronze (Figs.
Born at Lugdunum (Lyons) in Gaul (now France) as Septimius Bassianus (April 4, 186), the son of L.
junto a la confluencia de los rios Rodano y Saona, cerca de Lugdunum. En torno a ella surgio un santuario federal para el culto al emperador vivo donde anualmente se reunian representantes de Aquitania, Belgica y Gallia Lugdunensis (Hanlein-Schafer, 1985: 246 y ss.; Fishwick, 1987: 97 y ss.; 2002: 9 y ss.).
(33) Judging from an inscription at Chagnon that ascribes to his authority a ban on ploughing, sowing, or planting immediately beside the aqueduct at Gier, Hadrian may have been responsible for the whole project, which supplied the important city of Lugdunum. (34) He certainly built aqueducts, or replaced old ones, across the width of the Empire: at Italica, (35) Gabii (CIL 14.2797), Cingulum (CIL 9.5681), Dyrr(h)achium (CIL 3.709), (36) Sarmizegetusa (CIL 3.1446), Argos in the Peloponnese, (37) Coronea in Boeotia
The inscriptions and the iconography of the decorations were an essential part of the neo-classical image of Lugdunum that Sceve wished to present.
Pescennius Niger (193-194) and pacified the east (195-196), he returned to the west and claimed that Clodius had revolted in Gaul (196); Clodius marched against Severus, but was defeated and captured after a bitter and hard-fought battle near Lugdunum (Lyons) (197), and was beheaded shortly after.